Common Literary Terms (Part 2)

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This article is a continuation of the previous article on common literary terms you might encounter in GAMSAT Section 1. This will help a lot when you have to analyse the different passages in the exam. The terms in this list refer to both prose and poetry vignettes.

Glossary of Terms

Dramatic Monologue:

After tension has been brought to a head in many plays and dramatic pieces a lead character finally reveals his secret- and perhaps evil- thoughts on stage. He addresses no one in particular in the speech, and apparently speaks to himself.

Elegy:

An elegy is a piece of poetry that expresses a theme of loss or sorrow. Usually, they refer to the demise of a dear one.

Figurative Language:

The term figurative language refers to any word or group of words that the author uses by subversion of the actual meanings of the components. You will find ample examples of this literary device both in prose and poetry.

Flashback:

A flashback is a shift in the narrative to a time in a story’s past. (A flash forward is the opposite.) It is usually in the form of a reminiscence or recollection. Genre: A genre is the category  to which a  piece of work belongs. For example, a story or play can be a comedy, a tragedy or a romance.

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Hyperbole:

This refers to a gross exaggeration of a statement in order to drive home a point. E.g. “He is more ancient than the sea.”

Irony:

This refers to the situation when events or words are different from reality. For example, a dramatist presents a character as noble and honourable, but in fact he is the wickedest person in the play. Irony finds extensive usage in cartoons.

Metaphor:

It is a figure of speech in which something, to make a point, is described as something else. The association is made on the basis of characteristics. E.g.: That lady is a horrible old witch. You can distinguish a metaphor from a simile by the directness of its association. For instance, ‘he is as sly as a fox’ is a simile, whereas ‘he is a fox’ is a metaphor.

Motif:

This refers to a theme in a book/play/poem that can take the form of an object, idea or an event. The motif must appear throughout the narrative intermittently. If some of these terms and ideas are new to you then try to find out more about them, and find examples in write-ups. Knowing them is essential since the GAMSAT Section 1 vignettes might contain quite a few of them, especially in poetry.

Read Also: Common Literary Terms (Part 1)

Image Source: onmed.gr , cleverculver.edublogs.org

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